セミナー ロボットで楽しもう!

These robots come to the rescue after a disaster

ted
Over a million people are killed each year in disasters. Two and a half million people will be permanently disabled or displaced, and the communities will take 20 to 30 years to recover and billions of economic losses.
0:30
If you can reduce the initial response by one day, you can reduce the overall recovery by a thousand days, or three years. See how that works? If the initial responders can get in, save lives, mitigate whatever flooding danger there is, that means the other groups can get in to restore the water, the roads, the electricity, which means then the construction people, the insurance agents, all of them can get in to rebuild the houses, which then means you can restore the economy, and maybe even make it better and more resilient to the next disaster. A major insurance company told me that if they can get a homeowner's claim processed one day earlier, it'll make a difference of six months in that person getting their home repaired.
1:21
And that's why I do disaster robotics -- because robots can make a disaster go away faster.
1:29
Now, you've already seen a couple of these. These are the UAVs. These are two types of UAVs: a rotorcraft, or hummingbird; a fixed-wing, a hawk. And they're used extensively since 2005 -- Hurricane Katrina. Let me show you how this hummingbird, this rotorcraft, works. Fantastic for structural engineers. Being able to see damage from angles you can't get from binoculars on the ground or from a satellite image, or anything flying at a higher angle. But it's not just structural engineers and insurance people who need this. You've got things like this fixed-wing, this hawk. Now, this hawk can be used for geospatial surveys. That's where you're pulling imagery together and getting 3D reconstruction.
2:14
We used both of these at the Oso mudslides up in Washington State, because the big problem was geospatial and hydrological understanding of the disaster -- not the search and rescue. The search and rescue teams had it under control and knew what they were doing. The bigger problem was that river and mudslide might wipe them out and flood the responders. And not only was it challenging to the responders and property damage, it's also putting at risk the future of salmon fishing along that part of Washington State. So they needed to understand what was going on. In seven hours, going from Arlington, driving from the Incident Command Post to the site, flying the UAVs, processing the data, driving back to Arlington command post -- seven hours. We gave them in seven hours data that they could take only two to three days to get any other way -- and at higher resolution. It's a game changer.
3:10
And don't just think about the UAVs. I mean, they are sexy -- but remember, 80 percent of the world's population lives by water, and that means our critical infrastructure is underwater -- the parts that we can't get to, like the bridges and things like that. And that's why we have unmanned marine vehicles, one type of which you've already met, which is SARbot, a square dolphin. It goes underwater and uses sonar. Well, why are marine vehicles so important and why are they very, very important? They get overlooked. Think about the Japanese tsunami -- 400 miles of coastland totally devastated, twice the amount of coastland devastated by Hurricane Katrina in the United States. You're talking about your bridges, your pipelines, your ports -- wiped out. And if you don't have a port, you don't have a way to get in enough relief supplies to support a population. That was a huge problem at the Haiti earthquake. So we need marine vehicles.
4:08
Now, let's look at a viewpoint from the SARbot of what they were seeing. We were working on a fishing port. We were able to reopen that fishing port, using her sonar, in four hours. That fishing port was told it was going to be six months before they could get a manual team of divers in, and it was going to take the divers two weeks. They were going to miss the fall fishing season, which was the major economy for that part, which is kind of like their Cape Cod. UMVs, very important.
4:37
But you know, all the robots I've shown you have been small, and that's because robots don't do things that people do. They go places people can't go. And a great example of that is Bujold. Unmanned ground vehicles are particularly small, so Bujold --
4:54
(Laughter)
4:55
Say hello to Bujold.
4:57
(Laughter)
5:00
Bujold was used extensively at the World Trade Center to go through Towers 1, 2 and 4. You're climbing into the rubble, rappelling down, going deep in spaces. And just to see the World Trade Center from Bujold's viewpoint, look at this. You're talking about a disaster where you can't fit a person or a dog -- and it's on fire. The only hope of getting to a survivor way in the basement, you have to go through things that are on fire. It was so hot, on one of the robots, the tracks began to melt and come off. Robots don't replace people or dogs, or hummingbirds or hawks or dolphins. They do things new. They assist the responders, the experts, in new and innovative ways.
5:47
The biggest problem is not making the robots smaller, though. It's not making them more heat-resistant. It's not making more sensors. The biggest problem is the data, the informatics, because these people need to get the right data at the right time.
6:03
So wouldn't it be great if we could have experts immediately access the robots without having to waste any time of driving to the site, so whoever's there, use their robots over the Internet. Well, let's think about that. Let's think about a chemical train derailment in a rural county. What are the odds that the experts, your chemical engineer, your railroad transportation engineers, have been trained on whatever UAV that particular county happens to have? Probably, like, none. So we're using these kinds of interfaces to allow people to use the robots without knowing what robot they're using, or even if they're using a robot or not. What the robots give you, what they give the experts, is data.
6:49
The problem becomes: who gets what data when? One thing to do is to ship all the information to everybody and let them sort it out. Well, the problem with that is it overwhelms the networks, and worse yet, it overwhelms the cognitive abilities of each of the people trying to get that one nugget of information they need to make the decision that's going to make the difference. So we need to think about those kinds of challenges. So it's the data.
7:19
Going back to the World Trade Center, we tried to solve that problem by just recording the data from Bujold only when she was deep in the rubble, because that's what the USAR team said they wanted. What we didn't know at the time was that the civil engineers would have loved, needed the data as we recorded the box beams, the serial numbers, the locations, as we went into the rubble. We lost valuable data. So the challenge is getting all the data and getting it to the right people.
7:50
Now, here's another reason. We've learned that some buildings -- things like schools, hospitals, city halls -- get inspected four times by different agencies throughout the response phases. Now, we're looking, if we can get the data from the robots to share, not only can we do things like compress that sequence of phases to shorten the response time, but now we can begin to do the response in parallel. Everybody can see the data. We can shorten it that way.
8:22
So really, "disaster robotics" is a misnomer. It's not about the robots. It's about the data.
8:31
(Applause)
8:34
So my challenge to you: the next time you hear about a disaster, look for the robots. They may be underground, they may be underwater, they may be in the sky, but they should be there. Look for the robots, because robots are coming to the rescue.
8:51
(Applause)

100万人以上が、毎年災害で死にます。
250万人は永久に身体障害者になるか、追い出されます、そして、コミュニティは回復する20〜30年と何十億もの経済的損失をとります。
0:30
1日で最初の反応を減らすことができるならば、あなたは1000日または3年で全体的な回復を減らすことができます。
それがどのように働くかについて見ます?
最初の応答者が入ることができて、命を救うことができて、あるどんな氾濫危険でも減らすことができるならば、それは他のグループが水、道、電気を元に戻すために入ることができることを意味します、そしてそれは、手段、それからすべて彼らの建設人々(保険代理店)は家(それから、それはあなたが経済を復活させることができることを意味します)を再建して、多分次の災害によりよくてより強くしさえするだろうために入ることができます。
主要な保険会社は、彼らが住宅所有者の主張をある日早く処理してもらうことができるならば、彼らの家を修理してもらっているその人で6ヵ月の違いを生じると私に話しました。
1:21
そして、そういうわけで、私は、災害 ― ロボットが災害をより速く去らせることができるので ― ロボティックスをします。
1:29
今は、あなたはこれらの一組をすでに見ました。
これらは、UAVsです。
これらは、2種類のUAVsです:
回転翼航空機またはハチドリ;
固定翼であるもの、タカ。
そして、彼らが2005 ― ハリケーン・カトリーナ ― 年以降、広範囲に使われます。
このハチドリ(この回転翼航空機)がどのように働くかについて、あなたに教えさせてください。
構造エンジニアのために素晴らしい。
あなたが地面の双眼鏡から、または、衛星画像から得ることができない角度またはより高い角度で飛んでいる何からでも損害を見ることができること。
しかし、それは、これを必要とするちょうど構造エンジニアと保険人々でありません。
あなたは、これのようなものを固定翼にしました、このタカ。
現在、このタカが、地球空間的調査のために使われることができます。
それは、あなたがイメージを引き合わせていて、3D再建を得ているところです。
2:14
大きい問題が災害 ― 検索でないと救出 ― の地球空間的で水文学理解であったので、我々はワシントン州でOso泥流でこれらの両方とも使い果たしました。
捜索救助隊は順調にして、彼らが何をしているかについてわかっていました。
より大きい問題はその川でした、そして、泥流は彼らを絶滅させるかもしれなくて、応答者に殺到するかもしれません。
そして、そうであるだけでした応答者と物的損害に挑戦しているそれ、それはサーモン釣りの将来もワシントン州のその地域に沿って、危険にさらされているようにしています。
それで、彼らは、何が起きていたか理解する必要がありました。
アーリントン指揮所に車で戻って、データを処理して、事件指揮所から、UAVsを飛ばして、サイトまで車で行って、アーリントンから行って、7時間−7時間。
我々は、彼らが他のどの方法も得るためにわずか2〜3日に持っていくことができた ― そして、より高い決議で ― 7時間のデータで、彼らを与えました。
それは、画期的なものです。
3:10
そして、ちょうどUAVsについて考えないでください。
つまり、彼らはセクシーです−しかし、思い出してください。世界の住民の80パーセントは水で生きます、そして、それは我々の重要な基盤が水中にあることを意味します−我々が着くことができないパーツは橋などに合います。
そして、そういうわけで、我々は海の車両(それの1つのタイプにあなたはすでに会いました)から乗組員を奪いました。そして、それはSARbot(四角いイルカ)です。
それは水中に行って、ソナーを使用します。
さて、なぜ、海の車両はそれほど重要ですか、そして、なぜ、彼らはとっても重要ですか?
彼らは見落されます。
日本の津波 ― 全く荒廃して、沿岸地帯の量の2倍アメリカ合衆国でハリケーン・カトリーナによって荒廃する400マイルの沿岸地帯 ― について考えてください。
あなたは、橋、パイプライン、港について話しています ― 一掃される。
そして、港を持っていないならば、あなたには人口を支えるのに十分な救援物資を入れる方法がありません。
それは、ハイチ地震の大きな問題でした。
それで、我々は海の車両を必要とします。
4:08
すぐに、彼らが見ていたもののSARbotから、視点を見ましょう。
我々は、漁港に取り組んでいました。
4時間で、我々は彼女のソナーを用いてその漁港を再開することができました。
その漁港は彼らがダイバーの手のチームを入れることができる前に、それが6ヵ月になったと話されました、そして、それはダイバーには2週かかりそうでした。
彼らは落下釣りシーズン(それはその部分のための大きな経済でした)を逃しそうでした。そして、それは同じ彼らのケープコッドの種類です。
UMVs(非常に重要な)。
4:37
しかし、あなたは知っています、私があなたに見せたすべてのロボットは小さかったです、そして、それはロボットが人々がすることをしないからです。彼らはあちこち行きます。そして、人々は行くことができません。
そして、それの大きな例は、ビジョルドです。
車両が特に小さいという無人の根拠、それで、ビジョルド−4:54(笑い)は、4:55にビジョルドに挨拶します。
4:57
(Laughter)
5:00
ビジョルドが、塔1、2と4を通り抜けるために、世界貿易センターで広範囲に使われました。
あなたは粗石に登っています。そして、下ってrappellingします。そして、スペースで深くなります。
そして、ちょっとビジョルドの視点から世界貿易センターを見るために、これを見てください。
あなたは人または犬に合うことができない災害について話しています−そして、それは燃えています。
地階で生存者方法を始めることで唯一の望み、あなたは、燃えていることを行わなければなりません。
ロボットの1台で、トラックが溶けて、とれ始めたくらい暑かったです。
ロボットは、人々または犬に代わりません、またはハチドリまたはタカまたはイルカ。
彼らは、新しいことをします。
彼らは、新しくて革新的な習慣にあたり、応答者(専門家)を支援します。
5:47
しかし、最大の問題は、ロボットをより小さくしていません。
それは、彼らをより耐熱にしていません。
それは、より多くのセンサーを製造していません。
これらの人々が正確な時間に正常なデータを得る必要があるので、最大の問題はデータ(情報科学)です。
6:03
そして、我々がすぐに専門家にサイトまで車で行く時間を浪費しなければならないことなくロボットにアクセスさせることができるならば、それも大きくないだろうので、そこにいる人は誰でもインターネットについて彼らのロボットを使います。
さて、それについて考えましょう。
地方の郡で化学電車脱線について考えましょう。
専門家、あなたの化学エンジニア、あなたの鉄道輸送エンジニアがその特定の郡が偶然あることが起こるどんなUAVの上ででも訓練された確率は、何ですか?
おそらく、決してでなく、好きにしてください。
それで、彼らがどんなロボットを使っているかわかっていることなく、または、たとえ彼らがロボットを使っているとしても、我々は人々がロボットを使うのを許すためにこれらの種類のインターフェースを使用しています。
ロボットがあなたに与えるもの(彼らが専門家に与えるもの)は、データです。
6:49
問題は、以下に似合います:
誰がどんなデータを得ます。そして、いつ?
1つの行為は誰にでもすべての情報を送ることになっていて、彼らにそれを整理させることになっています。
さて、つまりそれに関する問題はネットワークを圧倒します、そして、更に悪いことに、差が生じそうである決定をすることは彼らが必要とするその唯一の良い情報を得ようとしている人々の各々の認識能力を圧倒します。
それで、我々はそれらの種類の挑戦について考える必要があります。
それで、それはデータです。
7:19
世界貿易センターに戻って、それがUSARチームが彼らが望むと言ったことであるので、彼女が粗石で深かった時だけ、我々はちょうどビジョルドからデータを記録することによってその問題を解決しようとしました。
我々がその時に知らなかったものはそれでした。そして、土木技師は好きでした、我々が箱ビーム、シリアル番号、場所を記録したので、データを必要としました、我々が粗石に入った。
我々は、価値あるデータを失いました。
それで、挑戦はすべてのデータを得ていて、正しい人々に渡しています。
7:50
現在、もう一つの理由は、ここにあります。
我々は、若干の建物 ― 学校、病院、市役所のようなもの ― が反応段階を通して異なる機関によって4回視察されるということを知りました。
現在、我々は見ています、我々が共有するロボットからデータを得ることができるならば、我々がする缶だけでなく、似ているものは応答時間を短くするために段階のそのシーケンスを圧縮します、しかし、現在、我々は平行に反応をし始めることができます。
誰でも、データを見ることができます。
我々は、そのように、それを短くすることができます。
8:22
とても本当に、「災害ロボティックス」は、誤った名称です。
それは、ロボットについてでありません。
それは、データについてです。
8:31
(Applause)
8:34
それで、あなたへの私の挑戦:
あなたが災害について聞かされる次のとき、ロボットを探してください。
彼らは地下にいるかもしれません、彼らは水中にいるかもしれません、彼らは空にいるかもしれません、しかし、彼らはそこにいなければなりません。
ロボットが救出に来ているので、ロボットを探してください。
8:51
(Applause)
posted by アトムペペ at 06:05 | セミナー | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

ルンバ開発元アイロボット社記者発表会

セールス・オンデマンド株式会社主催で、アイロボット社創立20周年を記念して、
同社CEOコリン・アングルも出席し、10月7日(木)に記者発表会が開催され、出席した。

DCF_0001.JPG


セールス・オンデマンド株式会社 代表取締役 木幡民夫の挨拶ののち
ロボットにおける自律型ロボットの重要性について講演があった。(明治大学理工学部 准教授 黒田洋司)日米の開発スタンスの違いについて言及された。アメリカでは実用化に重点が置かれtel-control,localization等採算性に重点を置き開発されている。日本では、夢を追い求めるムードが強く実用化研究は少ない。もっと実用化に重点を置くべきとの主張であった。

アイロボット社 CEO コリン・アングルからは、ホームロボットの未来と展望についてと題して興味深い話があった。
 ・2010年度の売り上げは、4億ドルに迫る勢い
 ・過去に14のビジネスモデルに取り組み技術を磨いている
 ・ルンバの販売累計は500万台
 ・今後高齢化社会となるのを見越して介護ロボットの開発を指向
 ・ヒューマノイド型のロボットの実用化にはあと15年はかかるであろう
 ・NASA、国防総省など政府系の売り上げは約40% 資金的には重要
 ・中国市場は重要だがまだ実用性について懐疑的
 ・軍事用の多目的作業ロボットPACKBOTは12万ドル
 ・民間用、軍事用の両方重要で軍事用の技術が民間用に流用される
  ルンバにも地雷探知能力の技術を流用している
 ・軍事用では、攻撃用ロボットは作っていないが人を殺さずに動けないようにする、
  相手を無害化する試みはありうる
 ・厳しい環境(軍事、炭鉱等)で働く人の助けになる製品を指向する

DCF_0002.JPG

DCF_0003.JPG
タグ:ルンバ
posted by アトムペペ at 06:26 | セミナー | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

広告


この広告は60日以上更新がないブログに表示がされております。

以下のいずれかの方法で非表示にすることが可能です。

・記事の投稿、編集をおこなう
・マイブログの【設定】 > 【広告設定】 より、「60日間更新が無い場合」 の 「広告を表示しない」にチェックを入れて保存する。